Download OXFORD Medical Ventilator System Basics A Clinical Guide Ebook PDF

 Download OXFORD Medical Ventilator System Basics A Clinical Guide Ebook PDF

Download OXFORD Medical Ventilator System Basics A Clinical Guide Ebook PDF In the late 1980s, as a young surgical resident at a teaching hospital in Shanghai, I experienced
first-hand the introduction of the intensive care unit (ICU) and mechanical ventilation to
mainland China. Medical professionals then perceived an ICU and ventilator to be a cure-all, although few had the knowledge to back up their beliefs. ‘We must have our own ICUs’, the head of my hospital declared. So a new surgical ICU was set up in two large, air-conditioned rooms. It was equipped with three Siemens SERVO 900C ventilators, a few patient monitors, and other basic equipment. The first ICU crew included a group of young physicians and nurses. I was a crew member.

Download OXFORD Medical Ventilator System Basics A Clinical Guide Ebook PDF A big challenge we faced was that none of us knew about mechanical ventilation or the ven-
tilator and its operation; something I was then assigned to learn. I delved into the operator’s
manual, which was, at the time, the only source of information available. I quickly discovered
that the manual was written by technical people, for technical people, and that my medical
education was of little use in this particular area. And so the nightmare began as I was called
around the clock to resolve various problems with mechanical ventilation. In a typical scenario,
I would find the ventilated patient clearly in trouble, the ventilator was alarming persistently,
and I hadn’t a clue what had gone wrong. I was forced to learn in a tough way, through trial
and error.

Download OXFORD Medical Ventilator System Basics A Clinical Guide Ebook PDF Ironically, around a decade later I became product manager for a ventilator manufacturer. In
this position, I had the opportunity for the comprehensive study of mechanical ventilation and
equipment. I also became deeply involved in ventilator development, marketing, and customer
training. From this experience I made several interesting discoveries:

Download OXFORD Medical Ventilator System Basics A Clinical Guide Ebook PDF a. The current mechanical ventilation education in medical or nursing schools is neither
adequate nor structured. Meaningful learning often begins after a graduate starts clinical
practice.
b. The equipment required for mechanical ventilation is a ventilator system with six essential
components. A ventilator is just one of them.
c. All positive pressure ventilator systems have the same or highly similar operating principles
and system composition, and all require the same conditions for operation. They may differ
here and there in technical implementation. Interestingly, their differences are often exagger-
ated and the similarities unmentioned.
d. The clinical outcome of mechanical ventilation relies much more on the user’s knowledge of
this therapy than it does on the equipment in use.
e. The knowledge specific to mechanical ventilation has two dimensions: its clinical application
and its equipment. The second dimension is often ignored in the related education.
f. Today, ample information about clinical application is widely available, but little exists about
the equipment.
g. Clinicians often feel responsible for the clinical application of mechanical ventilation, but
hold technicians responsible for the equipment.
Mechanical ventilation can be described as the clinical application of a ventilator system.
Clinicians who conduct this therapy need to understand both the application and the equip-
ment for three reasons. First, equipment knowledge is required to set up and maintain a properly.

Download OXFORD Medical Ventilator System Basics A Clinical Guide Ebook PDF