Pastest Mnemonics for Pediatrics Munib Haroon Ebook PDF download

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Pastest Mnemonics for Pediatrics Munib Haroon Ebook PDF download

Pastest Mnemonics for Pediatrics Munib Haroon Ebook PDF download

Pastest Mnemonics for Pediatrics Munib Haroon Ebook PDF download Ha em oph ilu s in fluenza e type b vaccine (HIB)
a. Rationale for vaccine: H. influenzae type b was a serious cause of in-
vasive bacterial infection, including meningitis, epiglottitis, and sep-
sis, before vaccine licensure in 1985. Since licensure it has become a
rare cause of such infections.

b. Type of vaccine: HIB is a con ju gate vaccin e with H. influenzae poly-
saccharide linked to various protein antigens, including diphtheria or
tetanus toxoids, to augment immunogenicity.
c. Timing of vaccination: HIB is recommended either at 2, 4, and 6
months with a booster at 12–15 months or at 2, 4, and 12 months, depending on the type of vaccine conjugate.

5. Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR)
a. Rationale for vaccine: immunizes against three viral diseases:
(1) Measles is a severe illness with complications that include pneu-
monia associated with significant mortality.

(2) Mumps is most commonly associated with parotitis but may also
cause meningoencephalitis and orchitis.
(3) Rubella causes a mild viral syndrome in children but may cause
severe birth defects in offspring of susceptible women infected
during pregnancy.

b. Type of vaccine: live attenuated vaccine
c. Timing of vaccination: MMR is recommended at 12–15 months with a
booster at either 4–6 years or 11–12 years of age.
6. Varice lla vaccin e
a. Rationale for vaccine: Varicella is the virus responsible for chicken
pox and zoster. Varicella often causes uncomplicated illness but may
cause severe disease in very young and in older patients.
b. Type of vaccine: live attenuated vaccine
c. Timing of vaccination: Vaccine is recommended at 12–18 months.
7. He patitis A vaccin e (He p A)
a. Rationale for vaccine: Hepatitis A is the most common viral cau se of h e patitis w orldw ide , although it is asymptomatic in up to 70% of infected children younger than 6 years of age. More severe dis-
ease is seen in older children and adults, although it is rarely associated with fulminant hepatitis.